Green Hills Butterfly Ranch

Belize’s largest butterfly exhibit displaying over 20 butterfly species including the iridescent blue morpho butterfly.

Blue Morpho

Morpho peleides
The blue morpho is among the largest butterflies in the world, with wings spanning from five to eight inches. Their vivid, iridescent blue coloring is a result of the microscopic scales on the backs of their wings, which reflect light.

Mexican Blue

Myscelia ethusa
The upperside of the mexican blue is black with iridescent blue bands, with the outer half of forewing having white spots.

Postman

Heliconius erato
The postman butterfly is known for its vivid coloration. There are twenty-nine identified subspecies, with many of them mimicking other Heliconius species as an adaptive feature.

Malachite

Siproeta stelenes
The malachite has large wings that are black and brilliant green or yellow-green on the upperside and light brown and olive green on the underside. It is named for the mineral malachite, which is similar in color to the bright green on the butterfly's wings.

Red Rim

Biblis hyperia
The Red Rim is also known as the Crimson-banded Black.

Glass wing

Greto oto
The glass wing has a unique transparent wing which allows it to camouflage without extensive coloration.

Tiger Longwing

Heliconius hecale

Isabella's longwing

Eueides isabella
The blue morpho is among the largest butterflies in the world, with wings spanning from five to eight inches. Their vivid, iridescent blue coloring is a result of the microscopic scales on the backs of their wings, which reflect light.

Giant owl

Caligo memnon
The owl butterflies are known for their huge eyespots, which resemble owls' eyes.

Monarch

Danaus plexippus
Other common names depending on region include milkweed, common tiger, wanderer, and black veined brown

Blue Morpho

Morpho peleides
The underside of the wing is different from the irridecent top. Featuring multiple eyes.
The blue morpho is among the largest butterflies in the world, with wings spanning from five to eight inches. Their vivid, iridescent blue coloring is a result of the microscopic scales on the backs of their wings, which reflect light.